Fashion and Chess: A Natural Match

Published by Silver Karen on

The game of chess has been played for centuries, and its complexity and strategy have captured the minds and imaginations of millions of people around the world. But what most people don’t know is that chess has also become a popular sport, with millions of people competing in tournaments and championships every year. Credible chess websites that offer chess mentoring became a hit for people who want to indulge in the game and eventually join international chess tournaments. And while chess is played on a chessboard, the game of fashion incorporates the game of chess into its stylish clothing trends.

Chess in Stylish Clothing

It is almost impossible to walk down the street these days without seeing someone wearing a stylish pair of chess-themed socks. Or a cool-looking chess shirt. Or a hipster-style cap emblazoned with a chessboard pattern. Within the world of fashion, the game of chess has become closely associated with the word “stylish”.

People have been pairing fashion and chess for centuries, but it wasn’t until a few years ago that the trend really took hold. It all started with a few boldface names in the fashion world, who began to incorporate chess into their clothing lines. Today, the trend has expanded to include all types of brands and styles, from high-end couture to tabletop toys and apparel. The result: stylish chess clothing for men, women, and children alike.

The game of chess has remained popular in its original form, but it has also been adapted to suit a variety of different playing styles. Nowadays, chess can be played by anyone, of any age, at any time, in any place, with a minimum of equipment and a maximum of friends. But it’s not just the game of chess that has been adapted to become a fashionable pastime. The way we dress has also been influenced by the game of chess, and this style of fashion has recently been dubbed “chess couture”.

Read also: The Guide to Dress Your Body Type Properly

Events that Incorporated Chess and Fashion

From New York Fashion, Museum,s and global advertising activities, fashion and chess have always been such an inspiring source. Let’s take a look at fashion events that have drawn inspiration from the brain sport, chess.

In 2005, Alexander McQueen chose to use chess games to present his spring/summer collection with the title “This is just a game.” At the exhibition, 36 models came out in line. The lights went dim and a chessboard was carefully projected on the floor. Models were standing on the elaborate chessboard like they were mimicking the chess pieces. However, there is no special reference to chess in the collection of clothes. Instead, McQueen used the game as the perfect tool to show the revision of the silhouette of his previous collection.

After 5 years, in New York Fashion Week, G-STAR called for an international chess game before the main runway show. The game included Master Magnus Carlsen playing against the Internet. In the same year, the company launched an advertising activity around Carlsen. Today, the Chess Champion still stands associated with the G-STAR brand.

In 2013, the international Chess Hall of Fame featured “A Queen Within”. The show included clothes from Gucci, Viktor & Rolf, McQueen, and Maison Martin Margiela among others. The show showed the Queen and its nine sides — The Mother Figure, Mother Earth, The Magician, The Sage, The Enchantress, The Explorer, The Ruler, The Heroine, and The Thespian. The show has had the fashion world in a buzz.

Despite the advertising activities, chess encouraged fashion events, and exhibitions, there is no standard look or uniforms when playing chess games. But as the fashion world collaborates with the world of chess, a Designer Chess Challenge had been introduced. It is the very first collaboration that will stay in St. Louis for two years. The challenge was to create two pieces of chess-inspired clothing. One is a clothing style that a chess player can wear during competition. And the other, an avant-garde piece, of course, inspired by chess.